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A root canal is a procedure that removes the decayed, infected pulp from inside the tooth. This can be done by either opening up the tooth from the top and cutting out the pulp with a special sharp instrument, or by drilling through the side of the root canal and then widening it to reveal and remove the infected tissue.

The main reason for a root canal is that there’s an infection in your tooth. If this isn’t treated, you’ll likely need to have your entire tooth extracted at some point.

The root canal is a dental care procedure that removes the nerve and blood supply from the tooth.

Root canal therapy is also called endodontic therapy. The purpose of root canal therapy is to remove the infection, clean out the infected pulp, and seal up the empty space with a filling material.

Root canals may be necessary when:

-you have pain in or around your tooth that won’t go away, or that changes in intensity over time

-your tooth has been damaged by decay or injury

Root canal therapy is done to remove the nerve from a tooth that has become infected or damaged. It takes about an hour and a half.

A root canal is done for teeth with cavities that have reached the pulp, which is the center of your tooth, or teeth with broken or chipped surfaces. A root canal removes the nerve from the tooth so it can heal, but it doesn’t take out any of your natural teeth.

The procedure begins by numbing your mouth with anesthesia to make you more comfortable throughout the procedure. After that, an opening is made in your tooth using a drill or other dental care tool. The canals are then cleaned and disinfected to remove any bacteria before being filled with a sealant called gutta-percha. Your tooth will need time to heal before.

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